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HyperX Alloy Origins 60 Review: The Best Tiny Keyboard for Gaming on the Go

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HyperX Alloy Origins 60 mechanical keyboard
Rating:
8/10
?

  • 1 – Absolute Hot Garbage
  • 2 – Sorta Lukewarm Garbage
  • 3 – Strongly Flawed Design
  • 4 – Some Pros, Lots Of Cons
  • 5 – Acceptably Imperfect
  • 6 – Good Enough to Buy On Sale
  • 7 – Great, But Not Best-In-Class
  • 8 – Fantastic, with Some Footnotes
  • 9 – Shut Up And Take My Money
  • 10 – Absolute Design Nirvana

Price: $100

Michael Crider

HyperX, Kingston’s gamer hardware label, is best known for its collection of high-quality headsets. But the company has been branching out into keyboards for several years, including creating its own gamer-focused mechanical switches and a notable partnership with Ducky. HyperX is ready to strike out with a fully self-branded 60% board, the Alloy Origins 60.

Here’s What We Like

  • Gorgeous metal case
  • Bright, even lighting
  • Intelligent 60% layout
  • Competitive price

And What We Don’t

  • No moving the FN button
  • Restrictive USB-C bay

It’s a tight little package, with a drop-dead gorgeous presentation, great lighting, and an easy-to-use layout. It’s also competitive: At just $100 retail for the Red switch option, it’s significantly cheaper than the Hunstman Mini from Razer or the low-profile SK622 from Cooler Master, currently the only other 60% boards from similar gaming manufacturers. If you’re looking to get into the 60% size for travel or just more desk space, the Alloy Origins 60 (I’m just gonna call it the AO60 from now on) is an excellent place to start.

I’m dinging the keyboard for lackluster software, and the design of its detachable USB-C cable could be better. I also wish it had the option to swap out the switches, fast becoming a standard for mechanical boards. But in terms of build, performance, and price point, the AO60 is a winner.

Vortex Poker 3, and that’s saying something.

HyperX Alloy Origins 60 feet, folded, deployed
Michael Crider

Note the feet. Users can keep the feet folded in for a super-sleek profile, which is still stable thanks to four wide pads. Or they can flip the feet out for two different angles: Each one has a sub-foot that adds a bit of adjustability. Combined with a metal top plate, this case is maximizing both portability and utility in great ways.

There’s just one sour note here: The USB-C port. Situated on the top edge between the 2 and 3 keys, it’s perfectly fine when you use it with the included HyperX cable (which is braided and six feet long, both nice touches). But the bay actually leading to the USB-C port is extremely narrow. Only one out of five of the USB-C cables I have on hand can actually fit in there.

HyperX Alloy Origins 60 USB-C port
The USB-C port for the braided cables is too narrow for most other cables. Michael Crider

That means if you want to use it with a longer cable for desktop management, or a C-to-C cable for a newer laptop or tablet, you’re going to have to either get picky or shave down the plastic protective side of the cable. A little more user testing would have caught this. As delivered, it’s a low point in an otherwise excellent physical design.

Drop’s ALT, the GMMK, and the Redragon K530, among others. But getting that beautiful RGB lighting and excellent metal body with the extra modular hardware, plus keeping the price down, probably put the kibosh on that feature. It’s hard to disagree with the choice given the result.

Razer’s similar Huntsman Mini. I’m happy to report that the AO60 is much more agreeable in that regard. Placing the FN button in the right CTRL space (with CTRL moved over and Menu abandoned) is a much more natural fit, at least for me.

Software

Crucially, there are more options for programming that layer, too. HyperX’s keyboard software allows all the keys except for FN to be rebound, on any layer. That single limitation kind of sucks for me—I prefer to use Caps Lock as a FN key and put easy-to-access arrow keys on the bottom right. But for any user who’s used to the limitations of the 60% form factor, or willing to learn a bit, it makes it easy to adjust.

HyperX’s software isn’t great. It doesn’t allow for super in-depth RGB animation, doesn’t tie into other API’s like Razer or Cooler Master, and it’s just as convoluted and in-your-face as other “gamer” programs. It gets the job done; that’s about as much as I can say in its favor. The software refused to recognize the review unit keyboard on my main desktop, but it worked on a laptop, so I’m prepared to chock that up to weirdness on the part of Windows.

HyperX’s NGENUITY driver program. Note that the FN button cannot be reprogrammed.

Of course, if you change the layout or the function layer around, the default (and very pretty) keycaps will no longer be accurate. The standardized key spacing will help with that: The AO60 is compatible with any standard keycap set.

The Best Option in a Niche Field

A 60% gamer-focused keyboard is a bit of a niche item, even if that niche is growing. If you’re unwilling to build your own, or wade into the wide and expensive world of niche keyboard suppliers, then you can’t do better than the Alloy Origins 60.

HyperX Alloy Origins 60 with tablet
Michael Crider

The software is a little limited (my kingdom for a movable FN key!), and that narrow USB-C port will limit your options for add-on cables. But a tiny, sleek, and gorgeous body, beautiful RGB lighting, and high-quality keycaps make this board an unbeatable bargain at just $100. You won’t find a 60% size that’s better from a major supplier.

Pick up this keyboard if you need something light, tough, and fast to take on travel gaming outings, or if you just want something that’s more comfy to type on than your laptop’s keyboard. It doesn’t make a lot of sense as a desktop board, but I predict plenty of gamers eager to follow the latest “battlestation” trends will dig it for that purpose, too.

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Amazon’s Totally free IMDb Streaming Support Comes on Chromecast with Google Tv set

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The IMDb TV logo over a Chromcast with Google TV.
IMDb/Google

Amazon’s fledgling IMDb Tv set streaming company is now accessible on Chromecast with Google Television and other equipment functioning the Android Television program. Like Crackle or The Roku Channel, IMDb Television set is a no cost streaming services with strike displays and motion pictures from Amazon Primary Video, Dreamworks, and even Disney.

IMDb Tv set is an successful alternate to some paid products and services like Hulu or Disney+, with reveals like Malcolm In the CenterMisplaced3rd Rock From the Sunlight, and Schitt’s Creek. It also properties some IMDb and Amazon Primary Movie originals, like the new docuseries Top rated Course: The Lifetime and Situations of the Sierra Canyon Trailblazers.

Technically talking, you could often accessibility the IMDb Television catalog on Android Television set by means of the Prime Video application. But the devoted IMDb Tv set application saves you the issues of logging into an Amazon account or navigating Amazon’s “channel” method in the Key Online video app.

You can obtain IMDb Television now on your Chromecast with Google Tv or Android Television technique. The cost-free streaming support is also accessible on Roku, Amazon Fireplace Tv, and Xbox gadgets.

Resource: IMDb by using The Streamable

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