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Samson Q9U Broadcast Mic Review: An Easy and Affordable Mic with USB-C and XLR

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The Samson Q9U broadcast mic
Rating:
8/10
?

  • 1 – Absolute Hot Garbage
  • 2 – Sorta Lukewarm Garbage
  • 3 – Strongly Flawed Design
  • 4 – Some Pros, Lots Of Cons
  • 5 – Acceptably Imperfect
  • 6 – Good Enough to Buy On Sale
  • 7 – Great, But Not Best-In-Class
  • 8 – Fantastic, with Some Footnotes
  • 9 – Shut Up And Take My Money
  • 10 – Absolute Design Nirvana

Price: 200

Andrew Heinzman

Researching and investing in audio products is one of the greatest hurdles for amateur podcasters and streamers. But Samson is offering an affordable, low-effort entry point to the world of high-quality audio with its $200 Q9U broadcast mic. With excellent noise rejection and options for USB-C or XLR connections, the Q9U is one of the best entry-level mics available today.

Here’s What We Like

  • Great sound quality
  • Doesn’t pick up much background noise
  • USB-C and XLR connectivity
  • Built-in headphone jack for audio monitoring

And What We Don’t

  • Mute button feels cheap, hard to tell when it’s active
  • The internal pneumatic shock mount doesn’t do its job
  • Doesn’t come with software to control the mic
  • Doesn’t come with a desktop mic stand or mic bag

Just to be clear, the Samson Q9U isn’t the cheapest microphone of its kind. But it’s a better entry-level option than many other mics because of its wide feature set and noise rejection. The Q9U sounds good in an untreated room, saving you the trouble of buying acoustic panels, and its optional XLR connection ensures that you can continue using the Q9U if you ever buy an audio interface.

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sound quality rocks, it works over USB-C and XLR, and because it’s a dynamic microphone, it doesn’t pick up much background noise in untreated rooms.

Over a USB connection, the Q9U is totally plug-and-play. It doesn’t require any extra drivers or software, which is mostly a good thing, though I wish Samson at least offered some kind of software to control the mic and apply global EQ (so you don’t have to set up EQ in each of your recording or broadcasting apps). But hey, you aren’t stuck using USB! The Samson Q9U’s XLR jack provides a lot of room for growth, saving you the trouble of buying a new mic if you decide to get an audio interface.

Samson filled the backside of this mic with all kinds of switches and ports, including a hardware mute switch, a mid-boost setting, a low-cut setting, and a headphone jack for live audio monitoring. For those who want to hear themselves and their computer’s audio output in real-time without setting up complicated software, the headphone jack is a very nice addition to this mic.

The Q9U's EQ switches, headphone input, and audio outputs.
Andrew Heinzman

Speaking of audio monitoring, you’ll be surprised the first time you hear yourself talking through the Q9U, because it’s very good at ignoring background noise. There isn’t any crazy software at play here, it’s just that the Q9U is a dynamic mic, a type of microphone that’s often better suited for untreated or noisy environments than condenser mics like the Blue Yeti or Audio-Technica AT2020.

With its cardioid (or heart-shaped) polar pattern, the Q9U only picks up noise directly in front of its capsule. If high-quality audio is your goal but you’re in a noisy or untreated room, then a dynamic mic like the Q9U might be a better option for you than a condenser mic. That’s not to say that everyone should use a dynamic mic—condensers like the Blue Yeti can sit at a more comfortable distance than the Q9U and still pick up consistent-sounding audio, so they may be a better option for remote workers or livestreamers who don’t want a mic hovering in front of their face all the time.

The Q9U also comes with some accessories to help seal the deal. There are the USB-A and USB-C cables, of course, but there’s also a windscreen. The Q9U already has an internal screen to keep your plosives from sounding explosive, but the external screen can help if you’re speaking loud, singing, or just love the Peter Piper tongue twister. Unfortunately, this mic doesn’t come with a desktop stand, so you’ll have to buy one separately (or go for a larger mic stand).

Rode PodMic and Shure MV7, have much better internal shock mounts than the Q9U.

Rode PodMic, and at $200, it costs less than the similarly-spec’d Shure MV7. Still, I suggest that you look other broadcast mics before pulling the trigger on the Q9U. You might find another USB mic that better suits your needs, or if you plan to buy a lot of mics in the future, you might skip USB mics in favor of cheaper, XLR-only mics.

Here’s What We Like

  • Great sound quality
  • Doesn’t pick up much background noise
  • USB-C and XLR connectivity
  • Built-in headphone jack for audio monitoring

And What We Don’t

  • Mute button feels cheap, hard to tell when it’s active
  • The internal pneumatic shock mount doesn’t do its job
  • Doesn’t come with software to control the mic
  • Doesn’t come with a desktop mic stand or mic bag

Tech

Lastly, an Justification to Get Your Nintendo Change Out in Math Class

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The Calculator for Nintendo Switch app.
Nintendo

Even though you’re participating in Monster Hunter Rise, I’m out below doin’ equations on my Nintendo Switch. You read that right—four a long time following its launch, the Change at last has a scientific calculator application. And it appears just like the old Apple iphone calculator! And it charges $10 … You’re never likely to download this application, are you?

Published by Sabec, the “Calculator” application can take gain of the Switch’s massive display screen and powerful processor, furnishing simple-to-read answers for all your challenging-to-realize math challenges. It will work in Tv set or handheld mode, and somehow requires up 53MB of storage (in other text, Switch Calculator is 20 periods larger than Google’s Android Calculator).

Calculator (2.0) on the iPhone.
Calculator (2.) on the Iphone. Apple

But the Calculator app’s standout characteristic is likely its structure. It is a close to-similar clone of the old Iphone calculator, from the button structure to the shade palette. Hey, Apple made its calculator with inspiration from a true-entire world source, so what’s the harm in getting inspiration from Apple?

If you want a speedy throwback to the early times of Apple iphone, go ahead and down load the $10 Nintendo Switch Calculator from the eShop. Just assure me that you’ll livestream the gameplay or do a speedrun of some math issues.

Resource: Nintendo by way of The Verge

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